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Monitor the World’s Forests with UrtheCast Imagery on Global Forest Watch


For the first time, UrtheCast imagery is now available for use on an environmental monitoring platform. From day one, UrtheCast’s vision has been firmly rooted in the concept of planet stewardship, aiming to provide people with the tools needed to change the world. This week, we mark an important step along that journey.

By opening up its API, UrtheCast has made it possible for Global Forest Watch (GFW) to incorporate high-resolution UrtheCast imagery into the GFW monitoring platform, allowing people to study changes in forests across the planet. As reported by GFW, about 30 percent of the globe is covered in forest, and high-res satellite imagery — like that provided by UrtheCast — remains a key factor in the effective monitoring of that forested land.

In partnership with GFW, UrtheCast offers imagery from three sensors, for free: UrtheCast’s 5m-res sensor, Theia, UrtheCast’s Deimos-1 satellite, and NASA’s Landsat 8. The entirety of this data is pulled from the UrtheCast API. Currently available on the GFW platform is imagery acquired between 2013 and 2016; an archive that is continuously updated with new imagery.

Already, UrtheCast data has been used to confirm the results of a University of Maryland study, proving that clearing for rubber plantations has severely degraded Cambodia’s once widespread forests:

Blog_Basemap vs Urthecast Imagery

 

To learn more about the use of UrtheCast data on the GFW platform, visit the Global Forest Watch blog. And be sure to watch the video below to learn more about UrtheCast’s Platform and open API.

 

Perspectives from UrtheCast on Vimeo.


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